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NAME
    POE::Component::SSLify - Makes using SSL in the world of POE easy!

SYNOPSIS
  Client-side usage
            # Import the module
            use POE::Component::SSLify qw( Client_SSLify );

            # Create a normal SocketFactory wheel or something
            my $factory = POE::Wheel::SocketFactory->new( ... );

            # Converts the socket into a SSL socket POE can communicate with
            eval { $socket = Client_SSLify( $socket ) };
            if ( $@ ) {
                    # Unable to SSLify it...
            }

            # Now, hand it off to ReadWrite
            my $rw = POE::Wheel::ReadWrite->new(
                    Handle  =>      $socket,
                    ...
            );

            # Use it as you wish...

  Server-side usage
            # !!! Make sure you have a public key + certificate generated via Net::SSLeay's makecert.pl
            # excellent howto: http://www.akadia.com/services/ssh_test_certificate.html

            # Import the module
            use POE::Component::SSLify qw( Server_SSLify SSLify_Options );

            # Set the key + certificate file
            eval { SSLify_Options( 'server.key', 'server.crt' ) };
            if ( $@ ) {
                    # Unable to load key or certificate file...
            }

            # Create a normal SocketFactory wheel or something
            my $factory = POE::Wheel::SocketFactory->new( ... );

            # Converts the socket into a SSL socket POE can communicate with
            eval { $socket = Server_SSLify( $socket ) };
            if ( $@ ) {
                    # Unable to SSLify it...
            }

            # Now, hand it off to ReadWrite
            my $rw = POE::Wheel::ReadWrite->new(
                    Handle  =>      $socket,
                    ...
            );

            # Use it as you wish...

ABSTRACT
            Makes SSL use in POE a breeze!

DESCRIPTION
    This component represents the standard way to do SSL in POE.

NOTES
  Socket methods doesn't work
    The new socket this module gives you actually is some tied socket magic,
    so you cannot do stuff like getpeername() or getsockname(). The only way
    to do it is to use SSLify_GetSocket and then operate on the socket it
    returns.

  Dying everywhere...
    This module will die() if Net::SSLeay could not be loaded or it is not
    the version we want. So, it is recommended that you check for errors and
    not use SSL, like so:

            eval { use POE::Component::SSLify };
            if ( $@ ) {
                    $sslavailable = 0;
            } else {
                    $sslavailable = 1;
            }

            # Make socket SSL!
            if ( $sslavailable ) {
                    eval { $socket = POE::Component::SSLify::Client_SSLify( $socket ) };
                    if ( $@ ) {
                            # Unable to SSLify the socket...
                    }
            }

  Mixing Server/Client in the same program
            Some users have reported success, others failure when they tried to utilize SSLify in both roles. This
            would require more investigation, so please tread carefully if you need to use it!

  Blocking mode
            Normally, Net::SSLeay requires the socket to be in blocking mode for the initial handshake to work. However,
            various users ( especially ASCENT, thanks! ) have reported success in setting nonblocking mode for clients.

            In order to enable nonblocking mode, you need to set the subroutine "NONBLOCKING" to a true value in this
            package.

                    sub POE::Component::SSLify::NONBLOCKING { 1 }
                    use POE::Component::SSLify;

            This is a global, and an EXPERIMENTAL feature! Please, pretty please report back to me your experience with
            this. Hopefully someday SSLify will be fully nonblocking, thanks to your help!

FUNCTIONS
  Client_SSLify
            Accepts a socket, returns a brand new socket SSLified. Optionally accepts SSL
            context data.
                    my $socket = shift;                                             # get the socket from somewhere
                    $socket = Client_SSLify( $socket );                             # the default
                    $socket = Client_SSLify( $socket, $version, $options );         # sets more options for the context
                    $socket = Client_SSLify( $socket, undef, undef, $ctx );         # pass in a custom context

            If $ctx is defined, SSLify will ignore other args. If $ctx isn't defined, SSLify
            will create it from the $version + $options parameters.

            Known versions:
                    * sslv2
                    * sslv3
                    * tlsv1
                    * default

            By default we use the version: default

            By default we don't set any options

            NOTE: The way to have a client socket with proper certificates set up is:
                    my $socket = shift;     # get the socket from somewhere
                    my $ctx = SSLify_ContextCreate( 'server.key', 'server.crt' );
                    $socket = Client_SSLify( $socket, undef, undef, $ctx );

            BEWARE: If you passed in a CTX, SSLify will do Net::SSLeay::CTX_free( $ctx ) when the
            socket is destroyed. This means you cannot reuse contexts!

  Server_SSLify
            Accepts a socket, returns a brand new socket SSLified
                    my $socket = shift;     # get the socket from somewhere
                    $socket = Server_SSLify( $socket );

            NOTE: SSLify_Options must be set first!

            Furthermore, you can pass in your own $ctx object if you desire. This allows you to set custom parameters
            per-connection, for example.
                    my $socket = shift;     # get the socket from somewhere
                    my $ctx = Net::SSLeay::CTX_new();
                    # set various options on $ctx as desired
                    $socket = Server_SSLify( $socket, $ctx );

            NOTE: You can use SSLify_GetCTX to modify the global, and avoid doing this on every connection if the
            options are the same...

  SSLify_Options
            Accepts the location of the SSL key + certificate files and does it's job

            Optionally accepts the SSL version + CTX options
                    SSLify_Options( $key, $cert, $version, $options );

            Known versions:
                    * sslv2
                    * sslv3
                    * tlsv1
                    * default

            By default we use the version: default

            By default we use the options: &Net::SSLeay::OP_ALL

  SSLify_GetCTX
            Returns the server-side CTX in case you wanted to play around with it :)

            If passed in a socket, it will return that socket's $ctx instead of the global.
                    my $ctx = SSLify_GetCTX();                      # get the one set via SSLify_Options
                    my $ctx = SSLify_GetCTX( $sslified_sock );      # get the one in the object

  SSLify_GetCipher
            Returns the cipher used by the SSLified socket

            Example:
                    print "SSL Cipher is: " . SSLify_GetCipher( $sslified_sock ) . "\n";

  SSLify_GetSocket
            Returns the actual socket used by the SSLified socket, useful for stuff like getpeername()/getsockname()

            Example:
                    print "Remote IP is: " . inet_ntoa( ( unpack_sockaddr_in( getpeername( SSLify_GetSocket( $sslified_sock ) ) ) )[1] ) . "\n";

  SSLify_ContextCreate
            Accepts some options, and returns a brand-new SSL context object ( $ctx )
                    my $ctx = SSLify_ContextCreate();
                    my $ctx = SSLify_ContextCreate( $key, $cert );
                    my $ctx = SSLify_ContextCreate( $key, $cert, $version, $options );

            Known versions:
                    * sslv2
                    * sslv3
                    * tlsv1
                    * default

            By default we use the version: default

            By default we don't set any options

            By default we don't use the SSL key + certificate files

EXPORT
            Stuffs all of the above functions in @EXPORT_OK so you have to request them directly

    head1 SUPPORT

    You can find documentation for this module with the perldoc command.

        perldoc POE::Component::SSLify

  Websites
    *   AnnoCPAN: Annotated CPAN documentation

        <http://annocpan.org/dist/POE-Component-SSLify>

    *   CPAN Ratings

        <http://cpanratings.perl.org/d/POE-Component-SSLify>

    *   RT: CPAN's request tracker

        <http://rt.cpan.org/NoAuth/Bugs.html?Dist=POE-Component-SSLify>

    *   Search CPAN

        <http://search.cpan.org/dist/POE-Component-SSLify>

  Bugs
    Please report any bugs or feature requests to "bug-poe-component-sslify
    at rt.cpan.org", or through the web interface at
    <http://rt.cpan.org/NoAuth/ReportBug.html?Queue=POE-Component-SSLify>. I
    will be notified, and then you'll automatically be notified of progress
    on your bug as I make changes.

SEE ALSO
    POE

    Net::SSLeay

AUTHOR
    Apocalypse <apocal@cpan.org>

PROPS
            Original code is entirely Rocco Caputo ( Creator of POE ) -> I simply
            packaged up the code into something everyone could use and accepted the burden
            of maintaining it :)

            From the PoCo::Client::HTTP code =]
            # TODO - This code should probably become a POE::Kernel method,
            # seeing as it's rather baroque and potentially useful in a number
            # of places.

COPYRIGHT AND LICENSE
    Copyright 2009 by Apocalypse/Rocco Caputo

    This library is free software; you can redistribute it and/or modify it
    under the same terms as Perl itself.